Journey to the Center of the Earth

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“Journey to the Center of the Earth” is a curated collection of articles published by the Smithsonian magazine. As you scroll down the page, you move deeper into the Earth — a thermometer and a depth gauge keep track of how far down the page you’ve scrolled. At each division (surface, crust, mantle, outer core, inner core), you’re given a selection of pieces about that layer as well as quick facts about the materials and physics which can be found at that depth.

It’s a lot to take in, but it’s very interesting!

Journey to the Center of the Earth

PhET Interactive Simulations

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“Founded in 2002 by Nobel Laureate Carl Wieman, the PhET Interactive Simulations project at the University of Colorado Boulder creates free interactive math and science simulations. PhET sims are based on extensive education research and engage students through an intuitive, game-like environment where students learn through exploration and discovery.”

PhET Interactive Simulations

Rendered Views of Titan

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http://www.beugungsbild.de/huygens/povray/titan_rendered.html

“The Mosaic of Titan’s surface, created from the raw images of the Huygens mission, is the basis for these images rendered with POV-Ray. The viewpoint for the renderings does not always represent a point on Huygens real trajectory. The atmosphere of Titan was modeled according to the properties that were already known prior to the Huygens mission.”

Rendered Views of Titan

Fourier Series Animation using Circles

“Any periodic signal can be decomposed into a set of simple oscillating functions (also known as harmonics) via the application of Fourier series expansion. Here, we demonstrate a few harmonics using circles and how they add up to obtain the resulting function. Each circle spins at a multiple of a certain fundamental frequency. First, we show each harmonic individually and later show what they add up to and how the circles can be used for their visualization.”

Fourier series are an incredibly useful tool for digitizing data, removing noise from signals, etc. The mathematics behind Fourier transforms requires a bit of calculus, but the concept can be explained visually in a rather elegant manner.

Fourier Series Animation using Circles

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel

http://joshworth.com/dev/pixelspace/pixelspace_solarsystem.html

“A tediously accurate scale model of the solar system.”

Spend hours scrolling and scrolling and scrolling and scrolling and enjoy the vast emptiness of space. Put it on lightspeed mode and sit back and watch near-nothingness pass by for 5-and-a-half hours until you reach Pluto from the Sun.

Follow Josh Worth on Twitter

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel

A Visual Introduction to Machine Learning

http://www.r2d3.us/visual-intro-to-machine-learning-part-1/

“In machine learning, computers apply statistical learning techniques to automatically identify patterns in data. These techniques can be used to make highly accurate predictions.”

Principal Component Analysis is an example of a very low-level sort of machine learning algorithm. By identifying things that are probably (within some statistical certainty) in a training dataset, you can identify the same things in a real-world dataset. This is why Google’s Deep Dream needs a training image — it needs to know what to look for.

A Visual Introduction to Machine Learning